Center for Arms Control

by Duyeon Kim [contact information]

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was adopted on April 22, 1970 and is the cornerstone of disarmament treaties. It contains a basic bargain: nuclear-weapon states agree to eliminate their nuclear weapons, non-nuclear-weapon states promise not to acquire such weapons, and all parties to the Treaty are guaranteed the right to peacefully use nuclear energy.

NPT PILLARS

1. Non-proliferation
2. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy
3. Nuclear disarmament

SIGNATORIES

189 (excluding India, Israel, Pakistan; North Korea withdrew in 2003)

ENTRY INTO FORCE

1970, but since then, we’ve seen the emergence of more states possessing and trying to acquire nuclear weapons and/or capabilities

NUCLEAR INVENTORY

About 23,000 nuclear weapons in the world

NUCLEAR WEAPONS STATES

5 - U.S., Russia, Britain, France, China

OTHER STATES WITH NUCLEAR WEAPONS

India, Pakistan, Israel, North Korea
** Not all countries that have nukes are given the name/status “nuclear-weapons state.” This is a very special/particular “title” defined by the NPT

OTHER KEY POINTS

* Every country has the sovereign right to peaceful uses of nuclear energy, but you must abide by international safeguards (rules) stipulated in the NPT. However, a state can still go from peaceful use to weaponization if it has the technology to produce nuclear energy.
* Countries are forbidden from acquiring nuclear weapons (if they don’t have them already).
* All members are not allowed to proliferate (transfer/spread) or receive transfers of nuclear weapons parts, technology and know-how.
* Nuclear-weapons states are not allowed to use their nuclear weapons on countries without nuclear weapons.

Duyeon Kim 202-546-0795 dkim@armscontrolcenter.org

Duyeon Kim is the Deputy Director of Nuclear Non-Proliferation at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation where her policy work focuses on North Korea, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear security and nuclear terrorism prevention. Kim has published in major publications including the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and World Politics Review. Prior to joining the Center, Kim was a career Diplomatic and Security Journalist in Seoul.

© 2012 Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation | 322 4th St., NE | Washington, D.C. 20002 | 202.546.0795

Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Site Map



Powered by ARCOS | Design by Plus Three