Center for Arms Control

Security Spending

Analysis of the Fiscal 2001 Defense Authorization Bills

On May 18, the House passed its version of the fiscal 2001 Defense Authorization bill (HR 4205) 353-63. The Senate is not likely to take up its version before the Memorial Day recess. Thus no action is expected

earlier than the week of June 5, although the schedule could change. On May 18, Majority Leader Trent Lott announced that the Senate schedule before the recess would include the foreign operations appropriations bill, the agricultural appropriations bill, an education bill, and a sex trafficking bill.

All numbers are budget authority and taken directly from House and Senate

Armed Services Committee reports.

TOTAL FUNDS

Administration Request: $305.3 billion

House Bill: $309.9 billion - Increase from President’s request: $4.6 billion

Senate Bill: $309.8 billion - Increase from President’s request: $4.5 billion

Both Senate and House bills represent a 4.4 percent increase in real

dollars (adjusted for inflation) from the fiscal 2000 level of $293

billion.

MAJOR TITLES OF BILLS

HOUSE:

$62.6 billion - procurement - $2 billion increase

$39.3 billion - research and development - $1.4 billion increase

$110.9 billion - operations and maintenance - $868 million increase

$75.8 billion - personnel - no change

$4.9 billion - military construction - $321 million increase

$3.6 billion - family housing - $79 million increase

$12.9 billion - Department of Energy defense activities - $281 million

decrease

SENATE:

$63.6 billion - procurement - $3 billion increase

$39.3 billion - research and development - $1.5 billion increase

$108.9 billion - operations and maintenance - $150 million increase

$75.6 billion - personnel - $170 million decrease

$4.9 billion - military construction - $366 million increase

$3.5 billion - family housing - $64 million increase

$12.8 billion - Department of Energy defense activities - $324 million

decrease

READINESS CRISIS?

Despite the cries of a readiness crisis, Congress favored new weapons when it added money. Of the $4.6 billion added by the House $2 billion (43%) went to unrequested weapons systems. Meanwhile the House added only $868 million (19%) to operations and maintenance (the account that includes most

readiness funds). That’s a meager 0.8 percent increase above the President’s request. Personnel accounts were not increased.

The Senate tended even more to new weapons. Procurement accounts received a $3 billion increase over the President’s request. That means unrequested weapons received 67% of the Senate’s increase. Meanwhile, operations and maintenance accounts were raised only $150 million and comprised only 3% of the increase. Personnel accounts actually suffered a $170 million cut.

Congress continues to cry readiness and fund pork.

JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

Neither the House or Senate forced a significant delay in the Joint Strike Fighter program. The Senate bill cuts $299.54 million from the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development (EMD) phase and raises

Demonstration and Validation (DEM/VAL) by $212.1 million. The House version requires the Pentagon to report to Congress before the plane can enter the EMD stage but does not shift funds.

QUALITY OF LIFE ISSUES

Both bills provide a 3.7% pay raise, allow military personnel to participate in the Thrift Savings Plan, and increase off base housing allowances.

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS

Both the House and Senate included provisions allowing for the procurement of five additional Virginia Class attack submarines (NSSN) in future year budgets.

The House measure includes an amendment to limit to 500 the number of U.S. troops serving in Colombia except to rescue U.S. troops or during a natural disaster.

After only two of the 19 intercept tests have been completed the House version claims “An effective National Missile Defense system is technologically feasible.” It also states that the President’s signature

of the Cochran missile defense bill last year “entails a commitment by the President” to deploy a national missile defense.

Both House and Senate bills include language prohibiting the reduction of the U.S. deployed strategic nuclear weapons arsenal below START I (Strategic Arms Reductions Talks) levels.

NUCLEAR-RELATED PROGRAMS

COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION (NUNN-LUGAR):

Administration Request: $458.4 million

House Version: $433.4 million

Senate Version: $458.4 million

BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE ORGANIZATION TOTAL:

Administration Request: $4.7 billion

House Version: $5.2 billion

Senate Version: $4.9 billion

NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE R&D:

Administration Request: $1.7 billion

House Version: $2.1 billion

Senate Version: $1.9 billion

THAAD R&D:

Administration Request: $549.9 million

House Version: $549.9 million

Senate Version: $549.9 million

NAVY THEATER WIDE MISSILE DEFENSE R&D:

Administration Request: $382.7 million

House Version: $407.7 million

Senate Version: $442.7 million

NAVY AREA THEATER MISSILE DEFENSE R&D:

Administration Request: $274.2 million

House Version: $274.2 million

Senate Version: $274.2 million

PATRIOT PAC-3 PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request: $365.5 million (40 missiles)

House version: $430.7 million (48 missiles)

Senate version: $365.5 million (40 missiles)

TRIDENT II (D-5) SLBM PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request:$472.9 million (12 missiles)

House Version:$472.9 million (12 missiles)

Senate Version: $472.9 million (12 missiles)

B-2 BOMBER PROCUREMENT AND R&D:

Administration Request: 112.7 million

House Version: $182.6 million

Senate Version: $117.7 million

MAJOR AIRCRAFT PROGRAMS

AIR FORCE F-22 FIGHTER PROCUREMENT AND R&D:

Administration Request: $3.8 billion (10 Raptors)

House Version: $3.8 billion (10 Raptors)

Senate Version: $3.8 billion (10 Raptors)

AIR FORCE/MARINE CORPS V-22 TILT-ROTOR AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT AND R&D:

Administration Request: $1.7 billion (20 Ospreys - 4 Air Force, 16 Marine

Corps)

House Version: $1.7 billion (20 Ospreys)

Senate Version: $1.7 billion (20 Ospreys)

NAVY F/A-18E/F ATTACK/FIGHTER PROCUREMENT AND R&D:

Administration Request: $2.9 billion (42 Superhornets)

House Version: $2.7 billion (39 Superhornets)

Senate Version: $2.9 billion (42 Superhornets)

NAVY/AIR FORCE C-130J PROCUREMENT (KC-130J, C-130J, EC-130J):

Administration Request: $363 million (4 aircraft)

House Version: $439 million (5 aircraft)

Senate Version: $527 million (6 aircraft)

AIR FORCE C-17 PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request: $2.6 billion (12 planes)

House Version: $2.6 billion (12 planes)

Senate Version: $2.6 billion (12 planes)

AIR FORCE F-16 PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request: $272 million (0 planes - upgrades and advanced

procurement)

House Version: $373.1 million (3 planes, upgrades and advanced procurement)

Senate Version: $392 million (0 planes - upgrades and advanced procurement)

AIR FORCE F-15 PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request: $282.4 million (0 planes - upgrades & advanced

procurement)

House Version: $532.4 million (2 planes, upgrades & advanced procurement)

Senate Version: $357 million (0 planes - upgrades & advanced procurement)

MAJOR SHIPBUILDING PROGRAMS

DDG-51 DESTROYER PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request: 2.95 billion (3 ships)

House Version: $2.95 billion (3 ships)

Senate Version: $3.1 billion (3 ships)

LHD-8 ASSAULT SHIP PROCUREMENT:

Administration Request:

© 2012 Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation | 322 4th St., NE | Washington, D.C. 20002 | 202.546.0795

Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Site Map



Powered by ARCOS | Design by Plus Three