Center for Arms Control

Security Spending

The FY 2002 Request

===== HIGHLIGHTS OF THE NEW MILITARY BUDGET ====

==Requests $343.2 billion in national defense (050) spending for fiscal 2002 representing a $32.6 billion increase (10.5 percent) above 2001 levels of $310.6 billion.

==The largest single-year increase since early in the Reagan Administration and the third largest peace-time increase since WWII. The increase alone is greater than the defense budgets of every country in the World except England, Russia, China and Japan and it is greater than the Gross Domestic Products of over one third of the individual nations in the world.

==Cuts Defense Department Cooperative Threat Reduction Programs (Nunn-Lugar) by $40 million from $443 million to $403 million. The Administration has already reduced the Department of Energy non-proliferation programs by $100 million.

==Provides Ballistic Missile Defense programs $8.3 billion (an increase of $3 billion or 57% from FY 2001).

==Despite talk of "skipping a generation of weapons," the budget funds all major weapons systems on the drawing board, postponing weapons decisions until the fiscal 2003 budget.

==The Defense Department's recent request for an additional $18 billion was not covered by the fiscal 2002 budget resolution adopted earlier this year and now has to be approved by the House and Senate Budget Committee Chairmen.

==The Pentagon's budget revision includes a section repealing the statute barring the unilateral reduction of the U.S. nuclear weapons (Section 714). The budget also provides for the retirement of all 50 U.S. Peacekeeper (MX) missiles.

===== MAJOR CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS REQUESTS =====

(in millions of dollars)

(number of weapons in FY 2002 and states of prime contractors in parentheses)

F/A-18 E/F Navy Super Hornet - (48 planes made in MA, MO, MD & CA) FY 2001 - $2,987 FY 2002 - $3291

F-22 Air Force advanced fighter (13 planes made in GA, TX, WA and FL) FY 2001 - $3,922 FY 2002 - $3,903

JSF Navy-Air Force-Marine Joint Strike Fighter (Competition in WA, MD, FL) FY 2001 - $682 FY 2002 - $1,537

V-22 Osprey - (12 planes made in TX, PA and IN) FY 2001 - $1,708 FY 2002 - $1,788

RAH-66 Army Comanche light helicopter (made in CT, PA, AZ, IN) FY 2001 - $608 FY 2002 - $788

AH-64 Longbow Apache helicopter (made in MD) FY 2001 - $755 FY 2002 - $918

Crusader Mobile Howitzer (made in MN, MA, MI, OK) FY 2001 - $352 FY 2002 - $448

C-17 Air Force airlift aircraft (15 planes made in CA and CT) FY 2001 - $2,931 FY 2002 - $3,684

C-130J cargo aircraft (2 planes made in GA and IN) FY 2001 - $206 FY 2002 - $221

E-8C Joint STARS airborne radar system (1 plane made in FL) FY 2001 - $294 FY 2002 - $332

F-16 Air Force Falcon (0 aircraft made in TX, CT and OH) FY 2001 - $121 FY 2002 - $0

NSSN New Attack Submarine (1 sub made in CT and VA) FY 2001 - $1,701 FY 2002 - $2,293

DDG-51 Navy Aegis destroyer (3 destroyers made in ME and MS) FY 2001 - $3,131 FY 2002 - $2,966

LPD-17 Navy transport dock ship (2 ships made in LA, ME, CA & AL) FY 2001 - $556 FY 2002 - $422

Source: Department of Defense Amended Budget Fiscal Year 2002

===== MOST EXPENSIVE WEAPONS SYSTEMS - TOTAL PROGRAM COSTS ======

???? billion: National and theater missile defense

$200 billion: JSF Navy-Air Force-Marine Joint Strike Fighter (3,128)

$ 65.7 billion: Virginia Class Attack Submarine (30)

$ 61.2 billion: F-22 (341)

$ 46.8 billion: F/A-18 E/F (548)

$ 44.9 billion: C-17 Cargo plane (134)

$ 27.2: billion: Trident II Missiles (453)

$ 11.2 billion: Crusader Mobile Howitzer (480)

$ 10.7 billion: LPD 17 (12)

$ 10.3 billion: LHD 1 (8)

$ 8.8 billion: Longbow Apache (850)

$ 8.6 billion: JSTARS airborne radar system

$ 6.3 billion: Airborne Laser (7)

Source: Selected Acquisition Reports, December 11, 2000; JSF, Crusader and ABL from Director of Operational Test and Evaluation Fiscal 2000 report to Congress

===== STRATEGIC NUCLEAR PROGRAM REQUESTS ======

B-1B bomber: $290 million

B-2 bomber: $166.9 million

Trident II (D-5 missile): $559 million (12 new missiles, made in CA)

Ballistic Missile Defense: $8.3 billion (an increase of $3 billion or 57% from FY 2001)

  • $3,940.5 million - Ballistic Missile Defense Midcourse Defense Segment
  • $685.3 million - Ballistic Missile Defense Boost Defense Segment
  • $495.6 million - Ballistic Missile Defense Sensors
  • $779.6 million - Ballistic Missile Defense System Segment
  • $968.2 million - Ballistic Missile Defense Terminal Segment
  • $783.7 million - Patriot PAC3 theater defense
  • $405.3 million - Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS High)
  • $388.5 million - Navy Area Missile Defense
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