Center for Arms Control

Security Spending

The FY 1997 Request

Military budget request for FY 1997 $254.4 billion
(Budget Authority) $ 8.9 billion decrease from fiscal 1996
Projected military spending for FY 1997 $258.7 billion
(Outlays) $ 6.9 billion decrease from fiscal 1996

(N.B. Above figures called "National Defense" or "050" in the federal budget; they include Pentagon budget plus the intelligence budget, Department of Energy military programs and a few smaller programs.)


SIX HIGHLIGHTS OF THE NEW BUDGET REQUEST

  1. In early February, Secretary Perry added $30.5 billion in new purchasing power to his 6-year budget plan -- including $4.3 billion in fiscal 1997 -- courtesy of lower-than-expected inflation rates. This is the third straight "Christmas" bonus for the Pentagon:
    • In December 1994, President Clinton added $25 billion over six years to the Pentagon budget to fund readiness increases, military pay raises and quality of life improvements.
    • In December 1993, the President added $11.4 billion to the military budget over 5 years to cover pay raises.
  2. According to Pentagon comptroller John Hamre, the Clinton Administration plans to reach a balanced budget by 2002 in part by cutting military spending a mere $16 billion while cutting domestic discretionary spending by $280 billion.
  3. Despite the Clinton domestic program cuts and the Clinton military budget add-ons, Congressional Republicans will try to add up to $14 billion to the Pentagon budget this year.
  4. Consistent with previous decisions, the new budget contains no new funds for additional B-2 bombers beyond the 20 authorized and requests $2.8 billion for ballistic missile defense (BMD). The BMD request includes $516 million for National Missile Defense (NMD), an amount designed to "enable the U.S. to develop within three years the elements of an initial NMD system that could be deployed within three years of a deployment decision".
  5. The Administration is requesting "contingency operations" funding in advance of fiscal 1997 rather than depending on a supplemental appropriation bill or reprogramming. The $1.1 billion request is for Bosnia, and for Provide Comfort and Southern Watch in and around Iraq.
  6. While military procurement continues to decline in fiscal 1997, it is slated to jump 54% between fiscal 1997 and fiscal 2001, or 40% after adjusting for inflation.

1. STRATEGIC NUCLEAR PROGRAM REQUESTS IN FY 1997 BUDGET

  • B-2 bomber: $684 million (to continue work on first 20 planes, made in California, Washington and Ohio)
  • Trident II (D-5 missile): $337 million (7 new missiles, made in California)
  • Ballistic Missile Defense: $2.8 billion
     
  • $516 million - National Missile Defense
     
  • $577 million - Patriot PAC3
     
  • $489 million - THAAD
     
  • $301 million - Navy Area Theater

2. MAJOR CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS REQUESTS (in millions of dollars)

FY 1996 FY 1997 WEAPONS PROGRAMS
(state of prime contractors in parentheses)
    (new generation weapons)
$1,053.5 $2,587.3 Navy F/A-18 E/F Hornet upgraded aircraft -12 planes
(made in MA and CA)
$783.4 $1,179.1 V-22 Osprey - 4 planes (made in TX, PA and IN)
$2,177.0 $2,007.4 F-22 Air Force advanced tactical fighter
(made in GA, TX, WA and FL)
$1,217.6 $774.6 New attack submarine
$583.8 $727.3 Milstar communication satellite (made in CA)
$292.2 $288.6 RAH-66 Army Comanche light helicopter
(made in CT, PA, AZ, IN)
$193.2 $581.8 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF-formerly JAST)
    (programs already in procurement)
$2,647.1 $2,321.0 Air force C-17 airlift aircraft - 8 planes
(made in CA and CT)
$2,395.7 $3,505.4 Navy DDG-51 AEGIS destroyer - 4 destroyers
(made in ME and MS)
$697.0 $786.4 E-8A joint stars airborne radar system - 2 planes
(made in FL)
$810.5 $920.2 Seawolf attack submarine
(complete third submarine, made in CT)
$513.8 $339.4 Air Force F-15E Eagle - 4 aircraft
(made in MO and CT)
$327.6 $253.4 Air Force F-16 Falcon - 4 aircraft
(made in TX, CT and OH)

[Source for item 2: Program Acquisition Costs by Weapons System, Department of Defense Budget for Fiscal Year 1997, March 1996]


3. MOST EXPENSIVE WEAPONS SYSTEMS - TOTAL PROGRAM COSTS

$ 350.0 billion - Navy-Air Force Joint Strike Fighter (JSF-formerly JAST) - 3,000 planes*
$ 89.2 billion - Navy F/A-18 E/F Hornet - 1,000 planes
$ 73.5 billion - F-22 Air Force advanced tactical fighter - 442 planes
$ 71.1 billion - Navy New Attack Submarine - 30 submarines
$ 58.5 billion - Navy DDG-51 AEGIS destroyer - 57 ships
$ 53.0 billion - Navy V-22 Osprey - 523 planes
$ 44.4 billion - Air Force B-2 bomber - 20 planes
$ 41.2 billion - Air force C-17 airlift aircraft (estimate) - 120 planes
$ 28.2 billion - Navy Trident II (D-5 missile) - 462 missiles
$ 13.1 billion - SSN-21 Seawolf submarine - 3 submarines
$ 6.3 billion - CVN-77 nuclear aircraft carrier - 1 ship

[Source for most weapons in item 3: Selected Acquisition Reports, September 30, 1995; *JSF cost comes from Washington Post business section, February 27, 1996.]


4. PERSONNEL IN THE MILITARY BUDGET

1,482,000 - active military personnel in FY 1996
1,457,000 - active military personnel in FY 1997
25,000 - reduction

931,000 - selected reserve in FY 1996
901,000 - selected reserve in FY 1997
30,000 - reduction

841,000 - Defense Department civilians in FY 1996
807,000 - Defense Department civilians in FY 1997
34,000 - reduction

3,165,000 - TOTAL MILITARY, RESERVE AND CIVILIANS IN FY 1997


5. FORCE LEVELS IN FY 1997 BUDGET

10 Active Army divisions (down from 18 in 1990)
42 Army Reserve component brigades (down from 57 in 1990)
3 Active & 1 Reserve Marine Corps divisions
11 Deployed aircraft carriers & 1 trainer/reserve (down from 15 and 1 in 1990)
357 Battle force ships (down from 546 in 1990)
10 Active and 1 reserve Navy carrier air wings (down from 13 and 2 in 1990)
3 Active and 1 reserve Marine Corps air wings
13 Active & 7 reserve Air force fighter wings (down from 24 and 12 in 1990)


6. OTHER PROGRAMS OF INTEREST IN FISCAL 1997

$328 million - "Nunn-Lugar" program to assist the former Soviet Union to dismantle nuclear weapons
Almost $500 million - counter proliferation of weapons of mass destruction
$1.3 billion - Pentagon environmental restoration work


7. SIX-YEAR MILITARY BUDGET AUTHORITY (Function 050)

FY 1996 263.3 billion
FY 1997 254.4 billion
FY 1998 258.8 billion
FY 1999 264.1 billion
FY 2000 270.5 billion
FY 2001 279.6 billion
FY 2002 287.9 billion
6 year total B.A. from FY 1997- 2002 $1.6 trillion

8. SIX-YEAR MILITARY OUTLAYS (Function 050)

FY 1996 265.6 billion
FY 1997 258.7 billion
FY 1998 254.8 billion
FY 1999 256.5 billion
FY 2000 262.9 billion
FY 2001 266.0 billion
FY 2002 275.5 billion
6-year total outlays from FY 1997- 2002 $1.6 trillion

9. PRIMARY CATEGORIES OF FUNCTION 050 (NATIONAL DEFENSE) OF THE FEDERAL BUDGET

FY 1997 budget authority
$242.6 billion - Pentagon
$ 11.7 billion - Department of Energy nuclear weapons activities and other
$254.4 billion

FY 1997 outlays
$247.5 billion - Pentagon
$ 11.3 billion - Department of Energy nuclear weapons activities and other
$258.7 billion


10. HIGHLIGHTS OF FY 1997 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) BUDGET FOR MILITARY ACTIVITIES

$5.4 billion - DOE account for environmental management (mostly clean-up of nuclear weapons facilities)
$3.7 billion - DOE budget for nuclear weapons activities

  • $1.8 billion - stockpile management (nuclear materials production and infrastructure)
  • $1.6 billion - stockpile stewardship (nuclear weapons design, testing, maintenance)
    • $164 million - Maintenance of Nevada test site
    • $191 million - National Ignition Facility
  • $587 million - non-proliferation

Glossary

BA - Budget Authority: represents the total amount that Congress makes available to an agency through authorizations and appropriations in a Fiscal Year
Outlays - Amount an agency actually spends, money that has been approved in the current fiscal year or in prior fiscal years
DOE - Department of Energy
FY - Fiscal Year, from October 1 through September 30
Real increase - Total increase adjusted for inflation

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